“Torrents of Emotion” in Pamela and Pilgrim’s Progress

In “Torrents of Emotion,” Historian Lynn Hunt argues that eighteenth century literature endorsed the modern human rights movement by developing personable characters with whom readers could empathize. Taking Hunt’s ideas into consideration, the opening of Pamela by Samuel Richardson allows the reader to directly relate to characters by drawing on techniques of the epistolary novel … More “Torrents of Emotion” in Pamela and Pilgrim’s Progress

Constructing a global experience through Sans Soleil

Chris Marker’s weaving of memory and imagination through the experimental, collage-formed filmography in Sans Soleil entices the viewer to inquire upon reality through a personal interpretation of the truth. Unlike other films, Marker’s work presents fact through the mix of cultural and worldly differences and the infusing of fact and fiction to reflect the current … More Constructing a global experience through Sans Soleil

Holocaust: The Perpetrator’s Psych

The question in Christopher Browning’s Ordinary Men posed towards the beginning, when the author questions how a group of normal/sane policemen could “[shoot] some 1,500 Jews in the Polish village of Jozefow in the summer of 1942,” encompasses much of Browning’s analysis within his work. He investigates the motivation of the Holocaust perpetrators and attributes … More Holocaust: The Perpetrator’s Psych