21st Century: Genocide and the state of international activism

To millions of people across the world, the term genocide refers to the systematic decimation of a group of people. Yet genocide in and of itself refers to a much broader sense of subjection, one which is explained through the roots of holocaust that generally lies in interwar periods and sinks back into the history of rising tension between two distinct groups. … More 21st Century: Genocide and the state of international activism

1933 Convention and Interwar Humanitarianism

The 1933 “Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees” was the first real commitment to build a legal framework on behalf of refugees, specifically Russian and Armenian refugees (Article 1), and was ratified by nine nations in which France and the United Kingdom were included. The primary strength of the 1933 convention was the establishment … More 1933 Convention and Interwar Humanitarianism

Why international law was not enough to stop the Holocaust

While international law existed prior to World War II, the form of law remained weak in protecting stateless people, such as the Jews in pre-World War II Europe, in a domestic sphere. Firstly, the rights an individual held under international law was granted in terms of their nationality and so if an individual believed his/her … More Why international law was not enough to stop the Holocaust

The Holocaust and lessons for the future

International law comes in many forms, often the product of international agreements and treaties between states or a natural evolution of customary practices. The greatest flaw of international law is that it does not have a distinct, single enforcement mechanism. There is no single governing entity to enforce these laws. Moreover, since there are many … More The Holocaust and lessons for the future

How law was used to adjudicate the Holocaust

In efforts to adjudicate the Holocaust, international law was reformed and used in post-War initiatives, such as U.S. and international affairs and the holding of the Nuremberg Trials; although these aspects may have seemed like sufficient responses to the atrocities of World War II, the post-war period still foresaw an era where similar crimes were … More How law was used to adjudicate the Holocaust

Rwandan Genocide & International Intervention

One of the most important things that we, as an international community, can take away from the Rwandan Genocide is that not intervening when a nation fails to protect its citizens ultimately allows for the tragedies to continue. As in the case with this Genocide, the Hutus were in large part free to continue persecuting … More Rwandan Genocide & International Intervention

International Activism: Past to Present

International activism is extremely grand in scale today, still riding the human rights movement but also encompassing a newer field of social entrepreneurship; however, the form of activism has begun to root itself in the technological hype of our current society. While the past has shown activism in the form of international law (i.e. Geneva … More International Activism: Past to Present

1933 Convention and Interwar Humanitarianism

The 1933 “Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees” was the first real commitment to build a legal framework on behalf of refugees, specifically Russian and Armenian refugees (Article 1), and was ratified by nine nations in which France and the United Kingdom were included. The primary strength of the 1933 convention was the establishment … More 1933 Convention and Interwar Humanitarianism