Holocaust: The Perpetrator’s Psych

The question in Christopher Browning’s Ordinary Men posed towards the beginning, when the author questions how a group of normal/sane policemen could “[shoot] some 1,500 Jews in the Polish village of Jozefow in the summer of 1942,” encompasses much of Browning’s analysis within his work. He investigates the motivation of the Holocaust perpetrators and attributes … More Holocaust: The Perpetrator’s Psych

Why international law was not enough to stop the Holocaust

While international law existed prior to World War II, the form of law remained weak in protecting stateless people, such as the Jews in pre-World War II Europe, in a domestic sphere. Firstly, the rights an individual held under international law was granted in terms of their nationality and so if an individual believed his/her … More Why international law was not enough to stop the Holocaust

The Holocaust and lessons for the future

International law comes in many forms, often the product of international agreements and treaties between states or a natural evolution of customary practices. The greatest flaw of international law is that it does not have a distinct, single enforcement mechanism. There is no single governing entity to enforce these laws. Moreover, since there are many … More The Holocaust and lessons for the future

How law was used to adjudicate the Holocaust

In efforts to adjudicate the Holocaust, international law was reformed and used in post-War initiatives, such as U.S. and international affairs and the holding of the Nuremberg Trials; although these aspects may have seemed like sufficient responses to the atrocities of World War II, the post-war period still foresaw an era where similar crimes were … More How law was used to adjudicate the Holocaust