Sociology of Joyce’s Women in A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man and the Irish Parallel

James Joyce traces the traditional roles of women as mothers and sexually objectified beings. Particular evaluation of the Christmas dinner party scene and the Ballyhoura Hills woman encounter provides evidence of women continuously fighting their conventional, subordinate positions to men. Yet, there seems to be apparent confusion between the expectations of silence and self-expression, as demonstrated by the dual nature that women take on in the novel. Joyce further exemplifies the estrangement of his female characters from social norms by paralleling their behavior to his own sentiments toward Mother Ireland, which he and his novel’s protagonist Stephen both come to resent and leave. With the subtlety of biblical references and the characters’ duplicitous behaviors, Portrait paints a confounded dynamic between the desire for personal liberation and institutional incarceration within both the novel’s women and Joyce himself. … More Sociology of Joyce’s Women in A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man and the Irish Parallel

The African Slaveries: Distinction of Trade

For millenniums slavery has infected cultures and civilization around the world, seeping its way into the histories of Babylon, Rome, and the Americas. Yet perhaps no slavery compares to that within the African continent, from which hundreds of millions of humans have been enslaved and trans-continentally exported for centuries. … More The African Slaveries: Distinction of Trade

From Dr. Dre to J. Cole: The Art of Sample-Based Hip-Hop

Travel back 16 years to 1999 when one of the most influential figures in the American hip-hop scene released The Aftermath, a groundbreaking album that sold over 6.6 million units in four years. Number 23 on Billboard’s Hot 100 at the time, “The Next Episode” featured on Andrew ‘Dr. Dre’ Young’s album sunk itself so … More From Dr. Dre to J. Cole: The Art of Sample-Based Hip-Hop

Twain vs. Lester on Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

Mark Twain once said, “Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect” (Sharma 120). Similarly, Twain’s Adventures of Huckleberry Finn analyzes the prevalent societal prejudices bestowed upon the American community. Although author Julius Lester condemns Twain’s limited and deprecating interpretation of African Americans’ roles within the … More Twain vs. Lester on Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

Emerson, Self-Reliance, and the Sin of Prayer

Henry David Thoreau once said, “Great God, I ask for no meaner pelf  than that I may not disappoint myself” (“Prayer” 418).  Similarly, Ralph Waldo Emerson embraces the concept of individual pride in Self-Reliance, the dependence of an individual solely on himself. The author advocates speaking one’s mind freely and avoiding the need to achieve … More Emerson, Self-Reliance, and the Sin of Prayer

Mrs. Dalloway: A Criticism of Social Uniformity

Armenian poet Hovhannes Tumanyan once said, “To conform is to lose one’s identity.” In other words, adhering to social norms often entraps people in a mentally uniform society. Similarly, in Virginia Woolf’s Mrs. Dalloway, the author continuously draws subtle criticism to the nature of social conformity through the perspectives of her characters. Woolf parallels her … More Mrs. Dalloway: A Criticism of Social Uniformity

Great Gatsby and the American Dream

Americans have throughout centuries sought the prospect of a full, opportunistic life by which they may attain prosperity and happiness. In The Great Gatsby, F. Scott Fitzgerald exposes the inevitable failure of the American Dream, which ultimately cannot deliver the fruits of its promise and asks the reader a vital question through narrator Nick Carraway’s … More Great Gatsby and the American Dream